Getting ready for spredin’ an’ sprayin’

The pasture is gradually coming to life after the winter period. I broadcast some winter rye grass last autumn. I wasn’t sure which variety to go with so experimented with two different lots. The more expensive seed won hands down. I’ll spread it again next year.

Unfortunately, grass is not the only thing growing. Weeds will soon pop up and when they do I’ll have them sprayed like last year. If I keep on top of them we can gradually use less and less chemicals. To help the grass grow strong the fertilizer company will truck in and spread about 5 tons of lime. It helps to neutralise the acidity in the soil. They will also deliver fertilizer to put down in a month or so.

The Daffs are out

The Daffs are out

In readiness, I’ve been spending time cleaning all the leaves from the pasture. It’s been a combination of rake and lawn tractor come giant vacuum cleaner. It’s dirty and dusty work. The alpacas will appreciate their clean pasture and I will appreciate the hard work done when I’m sorting their fiber in a few months time.

One of many piles

One of many piles

Mother nature is playing trick with the plants. Whilst we have had some very pleasant spring like days, we continue to have freezing temperatures over night. The Camilia seems to suffer a bit.

The Camilia would do better without frost

The Camilia would do better without frost

The chicken, on the other hand, have decided that spring really is on the way. They are back in full production. I collected 5 eggs yesterday and 6 today. You can’t beat farm fresh eggs!

Rodger and his girls on the range

Rodger and his girls on the range

 

2 thoughts on “Getting ready for spredin’ an’ sprayin’

  1. Kim

    What do you do with that huge pile of leaves? Looks like we’ll get plenty here so I guess it’s composting?
    Wish my sister still had chickens as she doesn’t really like eggs so I’d get plenty. Damn foxes.

  2. Mr Rob Post author

    We are surrounded by trees so the volume of leaves is incredible. Where possible, I collect them up and dump them in the woods. In the older pasture, where there is no easy dumping place I have been burning. I have to be very careful as burning has its dangers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Complete the anti spam line * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.